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Brandon Women's Musical Club fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4810
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1953-1965
Accession Number
13-2002
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
13-2002
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1953-1965
Physical Description
10 cm
History / Biographical
The Brandon Women's Musical Club was formed in 1945 by Miss Peggy Sharpe and Miss Hilda Smith. Together with a group of women from around Brandon, they managed to form a large club for, according to the club's constitution, "the study of vocal and instrumental music, literature and related arts and the encouragement of promising Junior Artists under eighteen years of age." With these goals in mind, the club undertook to provide tuition for young music students and contributed to the formation of the Brandon Women's Musical Choral Club. The club held meetings during which club members listened to guest speakers and observed performances by local musical and dance groups, as well as some national musical stars. The group also sponsored performances of musicals, plays, and recitals, and held an annual Christmas party.
Custodial History
This fonds was accessioned by the McKee Archives in 2002. Previous custodial history is unknown.
Scope and Content
Fonds is composed predominantly of two scrapbooks, one of which covers the years 1953-1960, the other the years 1960-1965. The scrapbooks contain newspaper clippings about the Musical Club's meetings and performances. There is also a file containing miscellaneous correspondence, the constitution and bylaws of the group, the club's membership lists from 1959-1964, and questionnaires about the Women's Musical Club.
Notes
CAIN No. 202589
Subject Access
Peggy Sharpe
Hilda Smith
Lorne Watson
Eric Davies
Nona Mari
Isabelle Coghlin
Janine Theriault
Peggie Sampson
Howard Leyton-Brown
Norman Chapman
Peter Koslowsky
Nora Needham
Lucien Needham
Brandon Women's Musical Club
Brandon Women's Musical Choral Club
Baroque Trio of Montreal
Brandon College School of Music
Wilson Trio
City of Brandon
women's clubs
choral groups
musical clubs
scrapbooks
Storage Location
2002 accessions
Storage Range
2002 accessions
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Brandon Folk, Music & Art Society, Inc. fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions8761
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1981-2001
Accession Number
17-2008
19-2008
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
17-2008
19-2008
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1981-2001
History / Biographical
The Brandon Folk, Music, and Art Society, Inc. has been in existence since 1985, when it was founded by a group of Westman people interested in providing an alternative art and music festival for the western Manitoba region. That group sponsored the first annual Brandon Folk, Music, and Art Festival in September of 1985 and established the community-based, non-profit structure of the Society. The Society's main goal is to provide musicians, artists and artisans with an opportunity to perform or display their talents on a professional level. The Society provides for its members and aspiring artists by sponsoring an annual Festival, coffeehouses, socials and other performances at local establishments, featuring local and touring performers. The Society is governed by a volunteer board of directors from many sectors of the local community.
Custodial History
Recrods in accession 19-2008 were in the possession of the Brandon Folk, Music & Art Society prior to their donation to the archives in September 2008.
Scope and Content
Accession 17-2008 (12 cm, 1985-1988) consists of 10 files containing promotional materials, meeting minutes and planning documents for Society's annual music festival. Accession 19-2008 (63 cm, 1981-2008) consists of: minutes, festival programs, publications, posters, financial records, correspondence; miscellaneous photographs.
Notes
History/Bio information taken from Society records. Description by Donna Lowe and Christy Henry.
Accruals
Further accruals expected
Storage Range
2008 accessions
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Brandon College fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4236
Part Of
RG 1 Brandon College fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1899-1967
Accession Number
R81-30
Part Of
RG 1 Brandon College fonds
Description Level
Fonds
Accession Number
R81-30
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1899-1967
Physical Description
25.5 m textual records and photographs
History / Biographical
JOHN CRAWFORD AND PRAIRIE COLLEGE: Although Brandon College was officially created in 1899, its roots go back much further to the late 1870’s and early 1880’s. It was during this time that Reverend John Crawford built Prairie College which was located in Rapid City, Manitoba . Rev. John Crawford was born in Castledawson, Ireland. While he was at boarding school in Belfast he was converted to the Baptist faith. His later education took place at Edinburgh University, Stephany College, and Regent Park Baptist College, all of which are located in Great Britain. He became a pastor in London, England, which is where he met his wife, a prominent and cultured lady. Crawford felt that his calling was in the backwoods of Canada, so he soon moved his wife and family to a farm near Toronto where he continued to preach. He was asked to join the faculty of the Canadian Literary Institute, a Baptist institution located in Toronto. He accepted the position and taught there for several years. The CLI, as it was commonly known, was a Baptist theological college. It was renamed Woodstock College in 1883. In 1879, Crawford saw the need for Baptist preachers in the newly opening territories of Western Canada. He felt that a self-sustaining college was the answer. Young men could work the land and gain religious education to prepare them for the ministry at the same time. He chose Rapid City, Manitoba as the site for his new college, because it was then recognized as an integral hub of the Northwest. It was also on the proposed transcontinental railway route. The students would build the college and cultivate the land. The Ontario Baptist Convention, while shying away from giving him official approval for the proposed college, did allow Crawford the liberty to canvass the Baptist churches in order to raise up to $2000 for the venture. Crawford secured the help of Reverend G.B. Davis, a student at Woodstock and a graduate of Morgan Park College, Chicago, to teach and help train the students. In the summer of 1879, Davis and nine students reached Rapid City. During that summer they cultivated the land and built a two-story college building out of local stone. The following spring, Rev. John Crawford sold his house in Toronto for an estimated $4000 and moved with his family to Rapid City to take up residence at the new college. The newly formed Prairie College opened in the fall of 1880 with 15 missionary students. Rev. Crawford was the Principal, Rev. Davis was the Vice-Principal, while Misses Emily and Fanny Crawford were teachers. Although the school was a success missionarywise, it did not do well financially. In 1883, Prairie College closed, partly due to financial troubles and partly due to the Ontario Baptists deciding that one Baptist Theological College in Canada was enough, and it was located in Toronto. The students at Prairie College were urged to finish their education in Toronto . This college would soon be known as McMaster University. S.J. MCKEE AND RAPID CITY ACADEMY: After the closing of Prairie College, Rev. Crawford left for the United States. However, Rev. Davis still saw a need for education in Rapid City and began to build another school. The Rapid City Academy opened in 1884. Because Davis accepted a pulpit in Moose Jaw soon after, he prevailed upon his brother-in-law, S.J. McKee , to come and take charge of the academy. McKee accepted the position, and the school flourished under his guidance. In 1890, McKee decided that the school would do better and reach more people if it was located in Brandon, Manitoba, where the railway had eventually gone through. He moved the Academy, and it was housed in various buildings in the city, until he found a permanent resting spot on the third floor of the Stewart Block on Rosser Avenue and Ninth Street . BRANDON COLLEGE: During the 1890’s the Baptists began to reconsider their decision of having just one theological college. With the settlement of the West, the Baptists were looking to increase their congregation. It was thought that higher education for potential ministry students would greatly help the Baptist cause. Rev. A. J. Vining, who was the Baptist Superintendent of Missions for Manitoba and the Northwest at the time, strongly advocated a Baptist College in Manitoba. In 1898, Vining interviewed Mr. William Davies, a prominent Baptist, in Toronto. Davies agreed to pledge $3500 a year for five years towards the establishment of a college in the West. His sister, Mrs. Emily Davies agreed to add $1500 to this amount. These pledges encouraged the 1898 meeting of the Manitoba Convention in Winnipeg to begin organization of a Baptist College to be located in Manitoba. A five member committee was chosen to consider the benefits of a Baptist college in Manitoba. Their report was to be read the following summer at the Portage La Prairie Convention. At the 1899 meeting of the Convention, the five member committee recommended: 1. “That we proceed to inaugurate a movement for the establishment of a denominational school at once. 2. “That we extend a call to Dr. A.P. McDiarmid to act as Principal. 3. “That we appoint a committee of twenty-one directors. 4. “That at present the question of the site be left with the President and Board of Directors but that no site be considered permanent till endorsed by this Convention at a regular or special meeting. On July 21st, 1899 it was resolved: 1. That we proceed to establish and develop an educational school at Brandon. 2. That the school be known as “Brandon College”. 3. That the quorum of the Board of Directors be fixed at eleven . Because S.J. McKee already had a thriving academy in Brandon, and he was a staunch Baptist, it was decided to merge Professor McKee’s Academy with the newly formed Brandon College. The classes would take place in the Stewart Block, the site of the Academy. S.J. McKee was hired as professor in Classics, Mental Science and French, while also acting as the unofficial vice-principal. He also had a position on the Board of Directors. Arthur W. Vining, Howard P. Whidden, J.B. Beveridge, and Miss Annie Beveridge rounded out the first faculty of Brandon College. The 1900 Brandon College Calendar states: The College aims at not only the mental culture of its students, but at the development of right character. It recognizes the supreme importance of surrounding the student during the period of college life with positive Christian influences, and to keep before him distinctively Christian ideals. The transcendent worth of character is kept in view in molding the life of the College, while the best possible intellectual training is sought. Though Christian, the College is in no sense sectarian. Students of all denominations will enjoy equal privileges. In every department the professors and teachers must be members of some evangelical church; in the Theological Department alone it will be required that they shall be members of the Baptist denomination. The College in all its departments is open to students of both sexes. The faculty will have watchful regard to the best interests of the students in every respect. Those whose conduct and influence are found to be injurious to the welfare of the College will be dismissed if milder disciplinary methods fail to effect reform . While the school would be run by the Baptists, it was always non-sectarian and co-educational. Students of all denominations were invited to attend Brandon College. The development of a person with the right character was as important as the mental culture of the students. Classes commenced on October 2, 1899. There were 110 students, 81 men and 29 women. Thirteen of these students had plans to enter the ministry. It soon became apparent that the building Brandon College occupied was far too small for its increasing numbers. Plans were drawn up in early 1900 to build a spacious college on the west edge of Brandon. Hugh McCowan was hired as architect and T.M. Harrington of Winnipeg was asked to build the school. A charter creating Brandon College was written. This Act briefly defined the purposes, jurisdiction, and administrative framework of the College. The “Act to Incorporate Brandon College” was approved by the Province of Manitoba and assented to on June 1, 1900. It granted the Baptist Convention authority over all College affairs. This authority included the appointment of the College Directors and professors, the creation of rules and bylaws, as well as control over the school’s curriculum. While the Board of Directors had control over financial matters, all Board decisions had to be approved by the Convention . The cornerstone for the new building was laid on July 13, 1900 by Mrs. William Davies. The College commenced classes in the new building, located at 270-18th street, on October 2, 1901. It cost approximately $44 000 to build. There was residence for 70-80 men as well as a dining room, kitchen, science laboratory, reception room, office, library and nine classrooms. The College consisted of an Academic Department, and Arts Department, a Theological Department, and a Business and Stenographic Department. The Commercial courses were discontinued in 1916 due to financial difficulties during the war. In 1922, the Business Department of Brandon College was discontinued because the College could no longer afford to keep it operating. The Academic Department consisted of Grades 9 through 12. Although it was a large and popular aspect of Brandon College, it began to decrease in size with the advent of secondary schools. Up until the early part of the twentieth century, most public schools stopped at around grade eight. After that, there were Normal schools that students could go to to become a teacher. Many students wishing to attend secondary school came to Brandon College, where a full secondary course was offered. By the 1920’s and 1930’s however, collegiates were becoming more commonplace. Students often didn’t have to travel as far to receive a higher education. By the early 1930’s most of the Academic Department had been discontinued because of lack of need and finances. By 1932, only the Grade Twelve course was still in operation. Although one of the main intents behind building Brandon College had been to prepare students for the Baptist ministry, the Theological Department was always one of the smaller departments. By 1915, the Board of Directors had assumed authority over all College operations. However, the Baptist Union still maintained control over theological education, through the Committee on Ministerial Education created in 1908. In 1916, the department was curtailed considerably because of the war. An Educational Secretary, hired in 1919, managed the teaching of theology at Brandon College. The Educational Secretary also controlled the College Maintenance Fund, which was specifically set aside to ensure the financial health of theological education. The Baptist Union’s residual power over theological education led to the creation of the Brandon College Commission in 1923. This joint commission of the Baptist Union and College Senate examined several instructors, including Harris MacNeill, for alleged improper Biblical interpretations. These claims stemmed from Fundamentalist Baptists, who believed that the theological students at Brandon College were being taught by Modernists. The Commission found little evidence to support these allegations, and the instructors were later exonerated of all charges. Even with this decision, the College had to discontinue the Theological Department in 1927 due to lack of funds. The College’s financial situation was very poor when Dr. Evans assumed control in 1928. The support from the Baptists was shaky, especially since the Fundamentalist-Modernist argument during the early 1920s. The Baptist Union Educational Committee recommended the Arts department be maintained as a significant training course for Christian leadership. The Committee wanted the re-establishment of the Department of Theology. In 1933, in an attempt to regain Baptist support, Rev. Ross C. Eaton was hired as Lecturer in Bible to help bring religious study back to the College. In 1934, John B. McLaurin was hired as Acting Professor in Theology. Dr. F.W. Pattison gave a Practical Theology course, while Dr. Evans made plans to increase the religious department even more. In 1935 Dr. C.B. Lumsden was appointed Professor of Theology, and in 1936, Rev. E.M. Whidden was appointed Head of the Department of Theology. In 1905, plans commenced for the building of a Women’s Residence to adjoin Brandon College. On May 24th, 1906 Mrs. A.P. McDiarmid laid the cornerstone for what was to become known as Clark Hall. The building was named for C.W. Clark, a Winnipeg doctor who gave $30 000 of the $40 000 dollars needed to build the residence. Dr. Clark gave the money to Brandon College because he believed that women should have every chance to receive higher education. On October 18th of the same year, Clark Hall was officially opened, with room for 50 women. With the expansion of the women’s department came programs that were geared towards young women of the era. A Music and Art Department was added to the College as was an Expression and Physical Culture Department. The heads of these departments were Abbie Helmer Vining, H. Hancock, and Gertrude Trotter. Miss Ernestine R. Whiteside was hired as Lady Principal and teacher of German and English. With the rise in immigration during this time came the chance of expansion at Brandon College. There were large numbers of Scandinavian settlements in Manitoba, and it was thought that introducing a Scandinavian Department at the College would entice prospective Swedish missionary students. The students would return to their settlements after being educated by the Baptists, and it was hoped that they would spread the Baptist word among the Scandinavian settlers. Mr. Emil Lundquist was hired in 1907 to head the newly formed Scandinavian Department. Physical fitness was stressed at Brandon College. Students were encouraged and expected to exercise. It was thought that a healthy body helped to create a healthy mind. There was more behind this ideal than simply healthy minds though, at least for the women students. During this period in history, it was often believed that women were not physically capable of learning to a great extent. It was thought that studying created too much of a stress on the female body, often leading to illness or permanent invalids. Before a girl was accepted to Brandon College, she had to furnish a letter from her doctor stating that she was physically able to go to school and study. As well, women were subjected to the “Clark Hall Line”, a daily two mile walk which was mandatory to all women. No matter what the weather was like they would pair up and, in a long line, walk down the streets of Brandon to the edge of the city. This line was often the cause of much amusement for the men of Brandon College. There were plenty of other sports offered at Brandon College for both men and women in an effort to keep the students physically active. This belief in physical fitness led to the development in 1908 of what was to become an annual College Field Day. In 1908, the Baptist Convention of Manitoba and the Northwest Territories became the Baptist Union of Western Canada. This change reflected a restructuring of the Baptist organization. The Union had a meeting every three years that consisted of delegates sent from Baptist churches throughout western Canada. The Baptist Union Board carried on the affairs of the Union and met semi-annually. Each year the Board created a budget based on the needs of the Union, then allocated funds to Provincial and Conference Boards. These other Boards had the responsibility of financing their local institutions and projects. The Baptist Union was not in direct control over these expenditures. If the budget was not raised, the Union had to incur the provincial deficits. This situation of mounting debts continued for several years. Principal McDiarmid’s title was changed to President McDiarmid in 1910. There is no document explaining this change, but it follows a trend in other colleges and universities during that period when the head of the school was known as the president. Up until 1910, the College had been loosely affiliated with the University of Manitoba. The Baptists refused to accept the University of Manitoba model of a higher institution, and they continuously sought to get a separate University charter that would give Brandon College degree-granting privileges. It was because of the Baptists firm belief in the separation of church and state that they could not accept the University of Manitoba model, as it would place the College under state control. The college could not secure a charter of its own, so it was decided in 1910 that Brandon College would affiliate with McMaster University. Brandon College was in debt following the construction of their first two buildings, and it became increasingly clear to the College Board that they could no longer rely solely on funding from the Baptist Union. In order to carry out their financial campaign and increase their administrative efficiency the Board felt it should control the College. In 1911 the Baptist Union was confronted with a proposal from Brandon College stating: ...in our confirmed judgment the work of the College should be under the immediate and unfettered direction of its own Board of Directors and Senate--that its Board of Directors, subject to the expressed general policy of the Baptist Union, control its business administration, and that its Senate should have direction of its education policies and work, viz., the determination of its courses of study, its curricula, its instruction, its examinations, etc. It appears after this date that Brandon College was much more in control of its curricula and courses of study. However, the school still relied almost completely on the Union for financial support. World War One began in 1914 and affected Brandon College greatly. Students were very patriotic to England, reflecting the ideals and propaganda of the time in their thoughts and actions. Classes shrunk as men enlisted, and military drilling in front of the College buildings became a commonplace scene. This was due to the fact that in 1915, a Canadian Officers Training Corps unit was established at Brandon College. A Brandon College platoon was organized as part of the Western Universities Battalion, the 196th. Over thirty Brandon College men were killed during World War One. After the cessation of hostilities in Europe, the students at Brandon College began fundraising to build a memorial gymnasium to honor their classmates who died during the war. Brandon College began to consider expansion in 1920, when an extension fund campaign was started in an effort to raise money to build a science building. Meanwhile, Dr. Whidden was involved in a continuous effort to maintain the College financially. That year, Mr. William Davies died, and in his will he left $100 000 dollars to Brandon College, on the condition that people in the west could match the amount dollar for dollar. Contributions to the College increased substantially with the 1923 arrival of Dr. Sweet, the new College President. He quickly gained the confidence of the Board of Directors, the faculty, the students, the community, and the Baptists. The motto of Brandon College up to this point in time seemed to have been “Speaking the Truth in Love”. But with the arrival of Dr. Sweet the motto appears to have been changed to “Education Crowned by Reverence”. After the Stock Market crash in 1929, the financial situation of the College grew even worse. The Great Depression severely limited charitable contributions for both Brandon College and the Baptist Union during the 1930’s. In 1931, the Baptist Union indicated by resolution that Brandon College would be closed at the end of the 1930-1931 school year unless the College could find a way to pay its own maintenance bills. The final announcement from the Baptist Union Board stated: ‘RESOLVED that the Board of Brandon College be requested to endeavor to continue the College in operation until the close of the current College year, and that in view of the inability of the Baptist Union to make provision for adequate financial support, that the College cease to operate at the end of the current College year .’ It was at this time the businessmen of Brandon, through the Brandon Board of Trade, began to get involved in the College situation. An organization called the Brandon College Citizens Campaign submitted a by-law that would raise $20 000 for the College for at least five years. The by-law had to be accepted by 60% of the ratepayers before it would be instituted. Despite a huge campaign effort, the by-law was rejected, mainly by the large working-class society in the city who did not see the need for higher education and who resented not being hired to do contract work there. After the by-law failed Brandon citizens raised $20 000 on their own to keep the school open for at least another year. By 1937, the College was still financially unstable, and although the Western Baptists supported the institution, they could no longer afford to help with the costs. In 1938 the Baptist Union passed a resolution withdrawing completely from any financial responsibility for Brandon College. BRANDON COLLEGE AS A NON-DENOMINATIONAL SCHOOL: The citizens of Brandon began to look for ways to keep the College open. A delegation of 60 representatives from towns in southwestern Manitoba asked Premier John Bracken and the Minister of Education for assistance to help keep Brandon College open as a Western Manitoba Arts College under the direction of an independent Board and on a non-denominational basis. The Brandon Board of Trade created a Brandon College Committee. Its members looked into ways the College could be saved. A.E. McKenzie was one of the central figures in this fight to save Brandon College . In July, McKenzie put up an offer of a $100 000 endowment for Brandon College. Shortly after that he upped the endowment to $300 000. The provincial government agreed to give the College $15 000 annually on the condition that the city of Brandon raise that amount as well and the $300 000 endowment was accepted. In September, McKenzie increased the endowment to $500 000 dollars, $100 000 of which would be revenue-bearing at 3%, which would raise $3000 a year for twenty years. Brandon was disappointed that the provincial government only offered $15 000, as they had originally asked for quite a bit more. However, they set about on a campaign to raise their share of the funds so that Brandon College could open for the fall term . In September of 1938, Brandon College reopened under the affiliation of the University of Manitoba. A provisional Board of Directors, consisting of Dr. J.R.C. Evans, Mayor F.H. Young, A.E. McKenzie, N.W. Kerr, K.C., E.M. Warren, H.O. McDiarmid, M.D., A.G. Buckingham, K.C., F.R. Longworth, and R.B. Alexander, was responsible for the administering of the affairs of the college. These men were all prominent Brandon citizens who had been involved in the fight to save Brandon College. They tried to complete the campaign to cover financial obligations and assure permanency of the college. The provincial government said that they would raise their support from $15 000 to $22 500 per year if Brandon could pass a by-law guaranteeing support of the college. On April 17, 1939, Bill 104 received assent as an Act of the Provincial Legislature incorporating Brandon College Incorporated. On June 6, a Brandon Bylaw was passed that approved the levying of one mill on the dollar from taxpayers for the next twenty years to help support Brandon College. This Bylaw assured that Brandon taxpayers would raise $5000 during the first year that it was levied, and this amount would increase during subsequent years as Brandon grew and prospered. On June 13, the Board of Directors approved recording of the Bill as the Charter of Corporation. The A.E. McKenzie endowment was authorized by Bylaw #5 of the corporation on December 19. With the outbreak of World War II in 1939 came the resurrection of the C.O.T.C. at Brandon College in 1940. Enrollment went down as young men and women joined the Armed Forces to go overseas. In order to keep the college out of debt, Dr. Evans created the War Emergency Fund in 1941. This fund raised $15 000 from 1941 to 1946. Scholarships were restarted at the college to help boost enrollment. Many of the scholarships were contingent on the recipient being a resident student in order to help raise residence numbers. In 1945, the A.E. McKenzie Trust of 1939 was canceled, and 90% of A.E. McKenzie’s stockholdings were transferred to the control of the Province of Manitoba. The A.E. McKenzie Foundation was established using the annual declared dividends from the 90% of the stock. This foundation was administered by the Minister of Education of Manitoba, the President of Brandon College, and a third person to be decided on by both parties. The annual grant of $10 000 from the foundation would be increased by $4000 if a Social Science Chair was established at the college. In 1946 that Brandon College hired its first Director of Public Relations. This man was Walter G. Dinsdale, a 1937 Brandon College graduate. A Guidance Committee was created in 1948. It was also during this year that Brandon College became an associate member of the National Conference of Canadian Universities. A Social Science Department was added in 1948, and the Biology Department was reorganized. In 1949 a Department of Political Science was created. The Board of Directors passed a resolution in 1949 to create a committee to hire a director for a financial campaign. The campaign went poorly. Brandon College, although not in the same position as it had been a decade earlier, was still not secure financially. The citizens of Brandon, having been through the Depression and the war years, did not have much left to give to the College. In 1951, the Federal Government provided the first of an annual fund of $8 000 000 to be divided between Canada’s universities and colleges based on enrollment figures. During this first year, Brandon College received $18 000 from the government. Education was first offered at Brandon College in 1952 with the co-operation of the Department of Education and the University of Manitoba. In 1953, Brandon College became an associate member of the Association of Universities of the British Commonwealth. The mortgage that had been assumed from the Baptists in 1939 was paid off in 1954. It was also during this year that Brandon College received its first new building since the 1922 Science Building. An “H-Hut” was moved onto the property and placed behind the Science Building. It was redecorated and used for student functions, a library, and a recreation area. The Board of Directors increased from twenty one to thirty six in 1955. The provincial grant of $22 500 was raised to $50 000. In 1957 the Brandon College Faculty Association was formed. This marked the beginning of the end of the ‘family’ structure of the college. A salary schedule was created in 1957 for the Arts and Science Departments. In November of 1958, the Expansion Committee of the Board of Directors was authorized to proceed with all aspects of expansion. By 1959, a new Arts and Library building was being planned. On Thursday, July 23, 1959, Dr. Evans died suddenly while on holiday in Robson, British Columbia. Before he died he had managed to secure funding and plans for the new Arts and Library building and Lecture Theatre. The Manitoba Government granted $500 000 and the Canada Council $102 000 towards the building of a new Arts and Library Building and Lecture Theatre. The new Arts and Library Building and the J.R.C. Evans Lecture Theatre were officially opened on January 6, 1961 by Mrs. John G. Diefenbaker (Olive Freeman, Class of 1923). It was also during 1961, that Brandon College welcomed its first overseas student. As well, J.E. Brodie, the former president of Great West Coal made a $200 000 gift to Brandon College, and gave $50 000 to the Expansion Fund. The next several years were full of expansion for Brandon College. The Men’s Residence, Dining Hall and Heating Plant were opened in 1962. In 1963, a Women’s Residence and the Music Building were opened. A Gymnasium was opened in 1965. The Board of Directors changed dramatically in the early 1960’s, becoming more influenced by the distribution of funds from government sources. Legislation in 1966 revised the Brandon College Act to reduce the number of members on the Board of Directors from thirty-six down to twelve. Seven of these twelve would be appointed by the Lieutenant Governor-in-Council, and three would be appointed by the Brandon College Corporation. One member would be elected by the Alumni Association, and the College President would be a member ex-officio. BRANDON COLLEGE BECOMES BRANDON UNIVERSITY: 1967 was an important year for Brandon College. Not only was a new Education Building opened, but the College ceased to exist. This was because a university charter had been granted to Brandon College. On July 1, 1967, Brandon College became Brandon University. Dr. John E. Robbins was appointed to be its first president. The university would enjoy a certain amount of freedom from the financial hardships it had endured over the past 68 years. As well, the university would no longer have its curriculum dictated to it from other institutions as it had during affiliation with McMaster University and the University of Manitoba.
Custodial History
The records have been located in a number of areas around the University including Clark Hall, the old Science building, the A.E. McKenzie building, and “the trailer”, which was a very old addition to Clark Hall and has now been removed from campus. The records are now in the S.J. McKee Archives located on the Brandon University campus.
Scope and Content
The fond consists of minutes, reports, correspondence, invoices, printed material, clippings and photographs. The collection spans from S.J. McKee’s personal papers from Rapid City Academy in the 1880’s through to the decision to grant university charter to Brandon College in 1967. It is a very interesting source for the history of Western Canada. Several different themes emerge in the fond. A very central theme concerns Baptist higher education in Western Canada, higher education in general, the development of curriculum in Canada, and the Baptist Western Movement. The development of religious higher education, especially Baptist training, is well-documented. Areas such as student associations, student life on campus, and women’s education are detailed in the collection. There is a very detailed look at the social aspects of college life, especially the difference between the genders in the realm of higher education. These themes can be found in the various Clark Hall scrapbooks and “Saturday Books” written by the lady principal. An economic theme is prevalent for much of the early history of Brandon College due to various financial restraints that the College and Western Canada faced. These themes are especially noticed in the Bursar and Registrar records. The administration of the corporation can be followed closely through the minutes and certain correspondence from the Board of Directors. A more in-depth look at the people involved in the running of an institution of higher learning can be found in the various personal papers of the presidents of the College. There are also several military files, dealing with the creation and operation of a C.O.T.C. regiment on campus during both the First and Second World Wars. The fond also provides a glimpse of how the wars affected daily life on campus and their after-effects on the College. The fonds also examines the effects that affiliation with other universities can have on curriculum, regulations and other aspects of College life.
Notes
The RG 1 Brandon College fonds description and finding aid were prepared by Karyn Taylor (nee Riedel) in August 1998.
Name Access
Duff Roblin
Tommy Douglas
Stanley Knowles
Brandon
Manitoba
McMaster University
University of Manitoba
Baptist Union of Western Canada
Subject Access
post-secondary education
Baptist Church
universities
co-educational institutions
Access Restriction
See series level for access restrictions.
Repro Restriction
Copyright provisions apply.
Finding Aid
Available
Storage Location
RG 1 Brandon College fonds
Related Material
McKee Archives: RG 6 Brandon University fonds. The Canadian Baptist Archives at McMaster University contain the following records related to Brandon College: Correspondence (1911-1936); McMaster Chancellor's Correspondence (1895-1926); McMaster Chancellor's Reports; History (1962); Stone & Garnet History (1969); Calendars (1899-1938); Report of Commission 1923 (pamphlet); Fact Concerning 1922 (pamphlet); Jesuit Methods (pamphlet); an incomplete set of the Quill; and exams. They also have The Western Baptist and the Yearbooks of the Baptist Union of Western Canada (1907-1996). (Source: Correspondence between Judith Colwell, Archivist, Canadian Baptist Archives and Thomas H. McLeod. Date: October 8, 1996).
Arrangement
The fonds is divided into fifteen series and two associated fonds.
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Brandon University fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions16
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1967 - present
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Creator
Brandon University
Description Level
Fonds
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1967 - present
History / Biographical
Brandon University received its charter on June 5, 1967, on the occasion of the visit of Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra and the Honourable Angus Ogilvie. The institution has its roots in Brandon College, which was established in 1899, by the Baptist Convention of Manitoba and the Northwest Territories and was administered by that authority until 1938. During these years it was an affiliate, first of the University of Manitoba and, from 1911 to 1938, of McMaster University. In 1938, it became a non-denominational affiliate of the University of Manitoba, under a board of directors elected by the Brandon College Corporation, and it continued as such until it was made a provincial university in 1967. 1967-1968 was the first year of operation as Brandon University. The University is a co-educational, non-denominational, government-supported institution within the Province of Manitoba. It is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) and the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU). As stated in The Brandon University Act (1998), the purposes and objects of the university are: (a) the advancement of learning and the creation, preservation and dissemination of knowledge; and (b) the intellectual, social, ethical and physical development and improvement of its students and employees and of society. To further its purposes and objects the university may: (a) establish and maintain such colleges, faculties, schools, institutes, departments, chairs and courses of instruction as the board considers appropriate; (b) give instruction and training in all branches of learning; (c) grant degrees, including honorary degrees, diplomas and certificates of proficiency; (d) provide facilities for original research in every branch of learning, and conduct or facilitate the conducting of such research; and (e) generally promote and carry on the work of a university. The mission statement of the University is to shape the whole person and enable students to make a positive difference as citizens and leaders. In a welcoming and supportive setting, the University emphasizes research, scholarship, critical thinking, performance, artistic creation, communication and participation, as a means of imparting value and meaning to society and contributing to the public good. The University nurtures and develops excellence in its programs, attracts an outstanding faculty, defends academic freedom, preserves knowledge and sustains a scholarly community where cultural differences are valued. The University strives to complement its primary mission of teaching and research by sharing the expertise of its staff, its information resources and its facilities with the greater community. PROGRAM EVOLUTION: 1967 Brandon College became Brandon University with authority to grant degrees 1998 The Brandon University Act was passed by the Manitoba Legislature, replacing the Brandon University Regulations Arts: 1902 First Arts graduates 1975 B.A. (4 year Specialist) degree 1983 B.A. (4 year General) degree 1990 Major in Business Administration 1991 Minor in Women's Studies 1992 Minor in Aboriginal Art 1996 Major in Business Administration (4 year) 1997 4 year Bachelor of Business Admin Science: 1975 B.Sc. (4 year Spec) 1983 B.Sc. (4 year General) 1986 Post-Diploma degree for Registered Nurses and Registered Psychiatric Nurses 1995 4 year degree in Psychiatric Nursing Education: 1952 Ed courses offered for the first time 1967 B.Ed. (5 year) 1969 B.Teaching (3 year) 1972 Project for the Education of Native Teachers (PENT) initiated 1974 Brandon University Northern Teacher Education Program (BUNTEP) initiated 1978 B.Ed (4 year) 1981 B.Teaching (3 year) discontinued as at October 17, 1981 1988 Concurrent B.Music/B.Ed (AD) degree program 1990 M.Ed. 1994 Brandon University Hutterian Education Programme (BUHEP) initiated Music: 1906 Dept of Music (Conservatory) established 1973 B.Mus. (4 year General) 1977 B.Mus. (5 year Music Education) 1980 Master of Music Degree offered for the first time in Manitoba 1988 Concurrent B.Music/B.Ed (AD) degree program Health Studies: 1998 School of Health Studies created and assumes responsibility for Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Science in Mental Health and Bachelor of Science in Psychiatric Nursing Interdisciplinary degree programs: 1972 B.G.S. 1998 Masters degree in Rural Development 1998 Bachelor of First Nations and Aboriginal Counselling degree program On December 19, 1985, the Board of Governors approved a set of recommendations regarding the administrative structure of the university. The recommendations renamed, abolished and instituted a number of positions at Brandon University.
Custodial History
Records in the fonds were in the possession of the President's Office until 1980, at which point they were transferred to the McKee Archives upon its creation. Subsequently, additional records have been transferred from the President's Office, the Senate Office and some faculties. Most records transferred after 1980 have separate accession numbers.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of sixteen series, including: (1) Office of the Chancellor; (2) Board of Governors; (3) Office of the President; (4) Office of the Vice-President; (5) Office of the Registrar; (6) Brandon University Senate; (7) Faculties and Schools; (8) Library Services; (9) Department of Extension; (10) Office of Development; (11) Brandon University Foundation; (12) Student Services; (13) Miscellaneous Publications; (14) Brandon University Students' Union (BUSU); (15) Brandon University Faculty Association (BUFA); and (16) Brandon University/College Artifacts.
Notes
Information for the History/Bio field was taken from Brandon University calendars 1967-2006, the Brandon University website (December 2005) and an article in "The Quill" (January 9, 1986). Description by Christy Henry, unless otherwise noted.
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Brandon Community Welcome Co-op Inc.

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions5894
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1992
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
MG 3 1.14.1
File Number
948
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1992
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of grants & correspondence
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.14.1 W. Leland Clark - political career Box 40
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Brandon Cinema Club fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4798
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1952-1956
Accession Number
9-1997
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
9-1997
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1952-1956
Physical Description
1 cm
History / Biographical
The Cinema Club of Brandon was formally created in May 1954, and operated for two and one-half years before dissolving due to lack of interest. The club was formed for the purpose of providing private screenings, on a non-profit basis, of films that normally would not have been exhibited in commercial theatres in Brandon. Films had to be assessed by the club membership as outstanding in quality. During its existence, the club sponsored the screening of two to three movies every second Sunday.
Custodial History
This fonds was accessioned by the McKee archives in 1997. Prior custodial history is unknown.
Scope and Content
Fonds includes a minute book that contains a record of each meeting held by the Brandon Cinema Club and a list of the elected executives. It also includes a file of newspaper clippings from the Brandon Sun about the Cinema Club.
Notes
CAIN No. 202661
Subject Access
R.A. Clement
Steffan Kossak
Beryl Burtnick
Walter Richardson
Brandon
Manitoba
associations
film
recreation
Storage Location
1997 accessions
Storage Range
1997 accessions
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Brandon Council of Women fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4823
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1952-1973
Accession Number
34-1998
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
34-1998
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1952-1973
Physical Description
66 cm textual records; 6 photographs
History / Biographical
The Brandon Council of Women (BCW) was active between 1895 and 1927, when it disbanded. Principally through the efforts of Mrs. Kaye Rowe of Brandon, the BCW was officially restablished in 1952. The Brandon Council of Women remained active until c. 1973. It brought together fifty-two women's organizations in Brandon, representing 2600 women.
Custodial History
The Brandon Council of Women fonds was transferred to the McKee Archives during the 1970s. It was accessioned in 1998.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of papers and photographs of the International Council of Women (ICW), the National Council of Women of Canada (NCWC), the Manitoba Council of Women (MCW), and the Brandon Council of Women (BCW). The ICW papers include meeting minutes. The NCWC papers include meeting minutes, resolution lists, pamphlets, newsletters, correspondence, financial records, yearbooks, and copies of Acts pertaining to women. The MCW papers contain copies of the MCW constitution, meeting minutes, resolution lists, correspondence, and committee reports. The BCW materials comprise the largest part of the fonds, and include meeting minutes, committee reports, financial records, correspondence, short course agendas, posters, pamphlets, memos, resolution lists, newspaper clippings, manuscripts, photographs, and scrapbooks.
Notes
CAIN No. 202626
Subject Access
Mrs. Kaye Rowe
Brandon
Manitoba
National Council of Women of Canada
Manitoba Council of Women
International Council of Women
Feminism
Women's organizations
Storage Location
1998 accessions
Storage Range
1998 accessions
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Brandon Women's Institute fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4879
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1963-1992
Accession Number
1-2006
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
1-2006
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1963-1992
Physical Description
45 cm
History / Biographical
The Brandon Women's Institute was established in 1963, by several women residents in Brandon who had been associated with Women's Institutes in their home communities. The Brandon Women's Institute was established in 1963, received its charter in 1965, and continued in operation until 1992.
Custodial History
Fonds was donated to the Daly House Museum by Mrs. Edna Hammond sometime in the 1990s. The records were retained by Daly House Museum until June 23, 2005, when they were donated to the S.J. McKee Archives.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains records generated in the course of Institute activities including minutes, scrapbooks, miscellaneous reports, publications, newspaper clippings, photographs and correspondence.
Storage Location
2006 accessions
Storage Range
2006 accessions
Related Material
Related women's institute collections in the McKee Archives include: Manitoba Women's Institute; Minnedosa Women's Institute; Cordova Women's Institute; Clanwilliam Women's Institute; Rathwell Women's Institute; Strathclair Women's Institute; Crocus Women's Institute; Southwest A Region - Manitoba Women's Institute; Douglas Women's Institute; Brandon Women's Institute
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Grants: Brandon Community Options Inc. E&I

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions5897
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1988
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
MG 3 1.14.1
File Number
951
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1988
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of grants & correspondence
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.14.1 W. Leland Clark - political career Box 40
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Community Resources Centre

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions3385
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1970-1975
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
2.4
File Number
41
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1970-1975
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of minutes, correspondence, an agreement, background information on the Centre, a draft constitution, proposals and reference materials.
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds Series 2: Board of Governors 2.4 Correspondence and subject files Box 2
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Community Resources Centre

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions3386
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1977
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
2.4
File Number
42
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1977
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of a history of the Rural Resource Archives, as well as a summary report to the Board.
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds Series 2: Board of Governors 2.4 Correspondence and subject files Box 2
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Regional and community studies

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions3459
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1976-1978
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
2.4
File Number
112
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1976-1978
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of memos, proposals for calender entries and reports.
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds Series 2: Board of Governors 2.4 Correspondence and subject files Box 6
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Brandon Hills Busy Bees fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4712
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1916-1988
Accession Number
36-2006
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
36-2006
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1916-1988
Physical Description
31 cm textual records 2 photographs
Physical Condition
Very good
History / Biographical
The Brandon Hills Busy Bees was formed in 1916 by eighteen women. The aim of the group was to assist with the war effort during World War One. At the end of the war it was decided to carry on the club and do community and welfare work. The Busy Bees met twice a month and, during World War Two, one meeting a month was devoted to Red Cross work. In 1969, the younger members of the Brandon Hills Busy Bees decided to form their own organization called the Brandon Hills Community Fireflies. The remaining members of the Busy Bees continued in their work until they disbanded as a society on September 14, 1988. At their last meeting it was decided to donate their records to the McKee Archives (minutes September 14, 1988).
Custodial History
In the minutes for the September 14, 1988 meeting of the Brandon Hills Busy Bees, Mrs. Mollie Baker made a motion to donate the record books of the organization to the Archive at Brandon University, and for Mrs. Nell Baker and Mrs. Lillian Coate to take them there. The motion was seconced by Mrs. Jean Kreller. Prior to their donation to the McKee Archives in 1988 the records were in the possession of members of the Brandon Hills Busy Bees.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of minute books with membership lists, accounts, newsclippings, correspondence, and reports, recipies (Treasurer's BK 1917-1919), treasurer's books, donation records, 2 photographs (1916 and ca. 1970s), a history of the Busy Bees 1916-1976 and calendars for the Womens' Auxiliary to the Grain Growers (Oakville, MB) for 1916-1918. The mintue book for 1976-1981 also contains the minute book of The Red Cross Emergency Unit, Brandon Hills for December 1943-1947.
Notes
Description by Christy Henry.
Storage Location
2006 accessions
Storage Range
2006 accessions
Related Material
Albert Angus Murray McPherson collection (21-2006)
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Brandon Assisted Passage Association fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4833
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1911-1917
Accession Number
11-1997
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
11-1997
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1911-1917
Physical Description
3 cm textual records -- 1 minute book
History / Biographical
The Brandon Assisted Passages Association was created in 1911, for the purpose of providing loans to "english speaking artisans" [sic] who wished to immigrate to Canada and work in Brandon, MB. In 1913, the Association was renamed the Brandon Imperial Home Reunion Association. The Association continued to operate and provided passage assistance in the form of loans to many immigrants until loan defaults mounted during World War I. After 1917, no further loans were given.
Custodial History
This fonds was accessioned in 1997. Its custodial history prior to this is unknown, but it was at one time in the posession of a H.R. Hoffman, and well as Richardson & Bishop Ltd. in Brandon.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of a minute book and a single page letter. The minute book is a record of every meeting of the B.A.P.A./B.I.H.R.A. and includes the names of the board members, the names of the applicants (in some cases their addresses), and the amounts loaned. In some instances, the fonds provides a documentary record of loan repayment.
Notes
CAIN No. 202578
Subject Access
Mr. Murhead
Mr. F. Wells
Mr. Killery
Mr. D. Christie
Brandon Imperial Home Reunion Association
Immigration
Imperialism
Storage Location
1997 accessions
Storage Range
1997 accessions
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Brandon Golf and Country Club fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4846
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1914-1948
Accession Number
11-1998
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
11-1998
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1914-1948
Physical Description
6 cm
History / Biographical
The Brandon Golf and Country Club was created in 1914, to serve the recreational needs of Brandon's social and economic elite. Leading Brandon politicians, professionals, and businessmen belonged to the club and served on its executive. The club was a place for Brandon's elite to play golf and socialize, and was affiliated with the Royal Canadian Golf Association. The club included a separate Verandah Club composed of women. In 1926, the Brandon Golf and Country Club became a member of the Canadian Ladies Golf Union. The club sponsored dances and dinners for its members. Strict policies for non-members were enforced. Brandon residents that were not members of the club could only play golf once a week, had to pay daily green fees, and had to be invited and accompanied by a member.
Custodial History
This fonds was accessioned by the McKee Archives in 1998. Previous custodial history is unknown.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of one scrapbook that runs from 1914-1948. The scrapbook contains minutes from director and shareholder meetings, as well as notices of upcoming meetings. There are also secretary and treasurer reports included in the scrapbook. Finally, there are a few newspaper clippings dealing with the club included in the scrapbook.
Notes
CAIN No. 202579
Subject Access
Brandon Golf and Country Club
Verandah Club
men's clubs
country clubs
Storage Location
1998 accessions
Storage Range
1998 accessions
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Brandon Square Dancing Club fonds

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions4909
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1951
Accession Number
12-2007
Part Of
RG 5 Western Manitoba Manuscript Collection
Description Level
Collection
Accession Number
12-2007
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1951
Physical Description
44 photographs (4 x 6" b/w); 1 file
Physical Condition
Fair. The photos have some crackling on the surface. Some of them also have what appears to be pencil marks on them.
History / Biographical
The Brandon Square Dancing Club was started by E.J. "Curly" Tyler as part of his degree program at the University of Utah. Part of his obligation for his degree was to organize a recreation group, so he organized the Square Dancers. The club operated for two years under Tyler's direction, with the individuals he taught receiving certificates for proficiency. After he ceased to be its leader, the Brandon Square Dancing Club continued for a number of years. Much of the dancing took place at the Ag Extension Centre.
Custodial History
Photographs turned up somewhere in the old Original Building at the time of the renovations (mid 1990s) and were brought to the McKee Archives.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 44 black and white photographs of the Brandon Square Dancing Club. The majority of the photographs depict actual dancing. There is also one file with photocopies of the photographs. These photocopies identify individuals in the photographs. Individuals in the photographs include: Edith Laycock; Bill Clement; Bea Lissaman; Reg Lissaman; Jean Hawley; Mrs. Murray Simmons; Murray Simmons; Dood Cristal; JoAnn Myers; Bob Myers; Jim Creighton; Muriel Cumming; Frank Cowan; Dean Finch; Birk Birkinshaw; Bill Baynton; Gil Wankling; Hugh Knowlton; Hilda Evanson; Archie Evanson; Gwen MacKay; Don (D.R.) MacKay; Burt Hurst; Ena Skafel; Einar Skafel; Marian Jones; Ray Jones; Joan Tyler; Curly Tyler; Bea Matheson; Murray Matheson; Bill Coleman; Gladys Wankling; Percy Finch; Lois Gibson; Ken Pratt; Jack Findlay; Phyl Harwood; Ozzie Pullow; Jean Pullow; Ann McDiarmid; Barb Brodie; Mal Brodie; Bud McDiarmid; Doris Boyd; Ethel Norrison; Dr. Arhurst; Mrs. Arhurst; Bob McPherson; Mary Gooden; Ron Godfrey; Elizabeth Godfrey; Gordon Cummings; George Gooden; Marg Purdy; Kay Findlay; Jack Coleman; Betty Coleman; Marion Unicume; Nels Unicume; Bob Hawley; Nan Coleman; Jack Purdy; Kay Birkinshaw; Lyal McGill; Norm Emerson; Shirley Emerson; Zana Hurst; Ethel Morrison; Leo Kennedy; Hazel Jones; Dr. R.C. Jones; Jim Blencowe; Betty Knowlton; Wesley Nelson; Marian Nelson; Pauline Tennant; Dave Dick; and Bob McMullan.
Notes
George Gooden provided the names on the photographs. Description by Christy Henry.
Repro Restriction
Copyright restrictions apply
Conservation
Photographs have been removed from original matting.
Storage Location
2007 accessions
Storage Range
2007 accessions
Arrangement
Photograph number 40 is missing using the original numbering system. The numbers on the photographs have been adjusted accordingly (ex. old #43 is now #42). The numbers on the photocopies have also been adjusted to reflect the new numbering system.
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Co-operation and community life

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/specialcollections232
Part Of
RG 4 Manitoba Pool Elevator fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
1976
Part Of
RG 4 Manitoba Pool Elevator fonds
Collection
Manitoba Pool Elevator Library Collection
Creator
Glassman, Martyn
Kisiow, Elaine
Tesky, Paul
Manitoba. Department of Education
Description Level
Item
Item Number
Archives 14-7.2-14
Item Number Range
Archives 14-7.2-14
Responsibility
[by] Martyn Glassman [and] Elaine Kisiow ; illustrated by the Co-operative Curriculum Project Art Department; stories and poems by Paul Tesky
Start Date
1976
Date Range
1976
Publication
Winnipeg : Department of Cooperative Development, Manitoba Department of Education
Physical Description
1 v. : ill. ; 29 cm
Subject Access
Community life
Storage Location
Box 7.2 - Manitoba I
Storage Range
Box 7.2 - Manitoba I
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N.E.E.D. (Community Respite Program)

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions5045
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1985
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
MG 3 1.14.1
File Number
133
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1985
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence re:Brandon University Building, Community Respite Program
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.14.1 W. Leland Clark - political career Box 5
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Killarney Community Compost EnviroPartners

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions5453
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1992
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
MG 3 1.14.1
File Number
516
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1992
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of grant
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.14.1 W. Leland Clark - political career Box 21
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Souris Valley Community Options

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions5497
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1991-1992
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
File
Series Number
MG 3 1.14.1
File Number
560
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1991-1992
Physical Description
1 file
Scope and Content
File consists of grant info.
Storage Location
RG 6 Brandon University fonds MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.14.1 W. Leland Clark - political career Box 21
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