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Clark Hall scrapbooks

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions11878
Part Of
RG 1 Brandon College fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1907-1953
Part Of
RG 1 Brandon College fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
9.2
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1907-1953
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of four scrapbooks detailing life at Clark Hall and Brandon College. They include newspaper clippings, photographs, cards, various programs and ephemera.
Storage Location
RG 1 Brandon College fonds Series 9: Clark Hall Women's Residence
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Graham site DiMe-30

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions11886
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2004-2008
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
1.4
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2004-2008
History / Biographical
The Graham site is a located adjacent to the Crepeele site towards the western end of the Crepeele locale. The Graham site was initially designated as a separate site early in the testing of the Crepeele locale due to what appeared to be a distinction between Early and Late Woodland ceramics. Subsequent testing has shown that this distinction was premature and that the cultural mosaic represented in the western section of the Crepeele locale may not readily separate in this manner. However, due to the records management that was already in place, the original separate designations have been retained. Environment Ground cover is a mosaic of aspen poplar groves and patches of mesic grass prairie. Excavation profiles indicate that this has been the situation since early precontact times, although as local climatic conditions change (primarily rainfall), the relative size of these areas and where they may have occurred also changed. The soil is aeolian sand sheet derived from delta outwash deposits along the western edge of glacial Lake Hind. The present topography is a variable dune landscape reworked by aeolian activity that creates a mosaic of microhabitats. These include forested patches in the lee of sand dunes grassland on the southern and western exposures and small damp lowlands that support balsam poplar, willows, red osier dogwood, high-bush cranberry and water birch. There is no permanent water source in the area although a small seasonal stream meanders through a damp lowland along the eastern margin of the Crepeele locale. Excavations at the Graham site took place from 2004 to 2008. Analyses of the recoveries shows that, with two exceptions, all of the occupations that have been tested produced bison foetal bone. The presence of foetal bison is a strong indicator of wintering occupations...The absence of foetal in some area does not necessarily indicate warm season occupations since these excavation series are small and the absence could be due to sample error or perthotaxic factors, such as scavenging of the fragile bone by dogs or other carnivores. From this evidence the Graham site has been interpreted as being primarily a wintering area. This is consistent with the lack of surface water (snow would serve as a substitute in winter) and the abundance of wood for fuel – a critical requirement for winter occupation. Cultural occupations date from Mortlach circa 250 B.P to woodland circa 580 B.P.
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Graham 2004, Graham 2005, Graham 2006 and Graham 2008
Name Access
Graham site DiMe-30
Subject Access
Archaeology Crepeele locale Graham site DiMe-30
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Crepeele locale Radiocarbon Dates

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions11966
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
textual records
Date Range
2003-2008
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
1.5
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
textual records
Date Range
2003-2008
Material Details
Radiocarbon date reports have been scanned in multi-page PDF files.
History / Biographical
The Crepeele locale is located within the larger Lauder Sandhills area, located in southwestern Manitoba. The area is a complex region of high biodiversity made up of stabilized sand dunes and wetlands that encourage the development of mixed forest and grass prairie. This area provided a variety of subsistence resources for pre-European hunter-gatherers. At the present time the grass prairie is now farm land but the areas of vegetated sand dunes have not been cultivated and have revealed numerous pre-contact archaeological sites. Archaeological surveying was conducted in 2003. The results of the 2003 Casselman survey showed over 300 test uints contained cultural material and indicated several areas for further examination including the Crepeele site DiMe-29, Sarah site DiMe-28 and Graham sites DiMe-30. From 2003 to 2008 field work took place at the locale with 75 - 1m x1m units excavated. The Crepeele locale is a complex region of high biodiversity made up of stabilized sand dunes and wetlands that encourage the development of mixed forest and grass prairie. This area provided a variety of subsistence resources for pre-European hunter-gatherers. At the present time the grass prairie is now farm land but the areas of vegetated sand dunes have not been cultivated and have revealed numerous pre-contact archaeological sites. To help establish the cultural sequence at the locale Radiocarbon dates were obtained from the three sites in the Crepeele locale. Radiocarbon dating The technique of radiocarbon dating was developed by Willard Libby and his colleagues at the University of Chicago in 1949. Radiocarbon dating is used to estimate the age of organic remains from archaeological sites. Organic matter has a radioactive form of carbon (C14) that begins to decay upon death. C14 decays at a steady, known rate of a half life of 5,730 years. The technique is useful for material up to 50,000 years. Fluctuations of C14 in the atmosphere can affect results so dates are calibrated against dendrochronology. Radiocarbon dates are calibrated to calendar years. Dates are reported in radiocarbon years or Before Present. Before Present refers to dates before 1950. The introduction of massive amounts of C14, due to atomic bomb and surface testing of atomic weapons, has widely increased the standard deviation on all dates after A.D. 1700 causing these dates to be unreliable. Accelerated mass spectrometry can more accurately measure C14 with smaller samples and can date materials to 80,000 years.
Scope and Content
Sub sub series contains radiocarbon dates from: Crepeele, Sarah and Graham sites.
Name Access
Crepeele locale Radiocarbon Dates
Subject Access
Archaeology Crepeele locale Crepeele locale Radiocarbon Dates
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Atkinson site - DiMe-27

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12080
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2006
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
2.1
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2006
History / Biographical
The Atkinson site was named for the landowners Ken and Karen Atkinson who were very helpful to the archaeology and geoarchaeology crews that worked at the site. Their support made the project possible. The Atkinson site story begins with the discovery of a charcoal lens eroding from the north bank of the Souris River in the summer of 2002. Study of Cultural Adaptations on the Prairie Ecozone (SCAPE) project geoarchaeologist Dr. Garry Running was exploring the stratigraphic layering in the bank when he noted the lens and reported it to Dr. Bev Nicholson. Upon closer examination, a tiny pressure flake was observed on the lens exposure and it was decided to collect a charcoal sample for radiocarbon dating. The resulting date of 5250B.P cal. 4225 B.C. placed the site in the early Archaic period. A second date on bone collagen of 5580B.P. cal. 4500 B.C. confirmed the earlier date and gave an averaged date of circa 4400 B.C or 6,500 years ago. The Atkinson site is one of the oldest excavated sites in Manitoba. Based on the date of the site and the kind of lithics (stone tools) present it is considered a Gowen occupation. The Atkinson site is evidence that bison hunters were active on the northern plains at a very early date. Similar sites have also been found on the High Plains in the U.S. and are referred to as the Mummy Cave Complex. The Atkinson Site is of great importance as it is the first undisturbed site of this type to be excavated in Manitoba and extends the range of these sites south and east from the type-sites in central Saskatchewan. Based on the date and sample evidence further excavations were conducted by Dr. Nicholson's team. in 2003, 2004 and 2006.
Scope and Content
Sub series has been divided into three sub sub series including: (1) Atkinson 2003, (2) Atkinson 2004; (3) Atkinson 2006
Name Access
Atkinson site DiMe-27
Subject Access
Archaeology North Lauder locale Atkinson site DiMe-27
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Lovstrom Block C - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12517
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.4
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
History / Biographical
Block C was situated in sparse oak forest with an understory of saskatoon, hazelnut and a thick ground cover of poison ivy and sarsaparilla. The block measured 3m and 3m and contained nine excavation units. All units were excavated to 35cm below surface. The soil horizons were much like the other blocks, except for a rusty brown stain in the first level, giving the upper black loam a mottled appearance. The brown patches were clay mixed with loam and were harder than the surrounding matrix. No definitive interpretation of these phenomena was attempted but this effect may be the result of natural brush or forest fires. Under the 5cm so d/humus (Ah) layer, the loam horizon extended approximately 5cm – 25 cm below surface, and averaged 20 cm thick. Bone was concentrated within this horizon between 10 cm – 20 cm below surface. Block C was notable for its concentrations of articulated bison bone. Most noteworthy was an articulated unit composed of lumbar vertebrae, pelvis, and sacrum. Several thoracic vertebra/proximal rib end concentrations were also recovered. There were more vertebrae and rib sections recovered in the units in proportion to other bones. A few sherds, some debitage and a single Prairie Side-Notched point fragment were among the recoveries. Based on the quantity of bone, the density of the bone layer, and the articulated butchering units the area has been interpreted as a bone midden. Faunal material was analysed by Jessica MacKenzie for her Honours Thesis: "A reconstruction of butchering processes in Block C from the Lovstrom site DjLx-1 in Southwestern Manitoba." Radiocarbon date: 850/115BP XU 79.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-sub series contains: Summary information of field methology, number and co-ordinates of excavations, personnel and their staff position; Field journals are daily records of recoveries, features and activities at the site; Site records include excavation level and unit summaries, feature sheets, profiles; sample records and maps; Artifact catalogues are lists and identifications of all artifacts recovered; Photographs are of excavation units, features, the landscape and personnel.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block C - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block C
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Lovstrom Block D - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12540
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987 - 1988
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.5
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987 - 1988
History / Biographical
Block D was wooded with oak and an understory of saskatoon and hazelnut with a thick ground cover of poison ivy and sarsaparilla. Root and rodent disturbance was extensive. Based on the recoveries from Test Unit 22 during the survey, further excavations were carried out. Two units 87 and 93 were excavated in 1987. A further four units were excavated in 1988. There appears to be a pre contact occupation and a protohistoric feature within the block. Diagnostic lithics included a chert Plains Side-notch projectile point, and a large Woodland side-notched point. The lithic materials from Block D are primarily local cherts followed in abundance by Knife River Flint and Tongue River Silicified Sediment – both of which are exotics imported from the southwest. Faunal remains were primarily bison. Thin-walled obliterated fabric impressed pottery with grit temper was recovered in all units. Diagnostic ceramics included two rims, one with a fabric impressed exterior and the lip notched with dowel impressions, and a second thick walled rim was fabric impressed to the lip. The ceramic wares appear to be essentially a Woodland complex with overtones of Plains influence. RC date: 230/90 BP.
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Lovstrom Block D 1987 and Lovstrom Block D 1988.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block D - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block D
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Lovstrom Block E - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12567
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987 - 1991
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.6
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987 - 1991
History / Biographical
This site is situated in a naturally sheltered area with a low rise to the east and south partly encircling a flat area open to the west. Present natural vegetation is an open oak forest with a light understory of saskatoon, hazelnut, poison ivy and sarsaparilla. It is situated on the till plain at the upper end of a ravine leading to Jock’s Creek. Two test units six meters apart were excavated in 1987 and produced cultural materials which warranted a block excavation, so seven contiguous 1m2 units were then opened. These units proved to be very productive of cultural remains. Subsequent excavations in 1988 increased the number of excavated units to 21. In 1991 a further eight units were excavated for a total of 29 excavations and two test units. Excavations went deeper in this block than in Blocks C or B. Remains from the block included bison bone, bone tools, fire-cracked rock, ceramics, lithics including tools and debitage and a hearth. Another occupation was recovered in 1991 containing a hearth and living floor. Radiocarbon samples have produced two distinct sets of radiocarbon dates from 1987 and 1988 excavations. There appears to be two or possibly three cultural horizons definable within this block. An upper cultural horizon, located between 14-21 cm below surface, contains large bison bone and fire-cracked rock dating to 465/100B.P from XU 128. A lower horizon in the 20-25 cm level contained FCR, bison bone and lithic scatter that was dated to 675/70 B.P. from XU 122 and 715/110 from XU 114.
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Lovstrom Block E 1987, Lovstrom Block E 1988 and Lovstrom Block E 1991.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block E - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block E
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Sarah site DiMe-28

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions11829
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2004
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
1.3
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2004
History / Biographical
The Sarah site was chosen for excavation based on the results of the Casselman survey. The survey recovered significant amounts of faunal remains, some ceramics and lithics from the test pits. Excavations took place in 2003 at Crepeele West (Units 1-5) and Crepeele East (Units 6-9). The site was subsequently renamed the Sarah site DiMe-28. In 2004 another 9 units were excavated (Units 10-18). Based on the recoveries it was determined that the Sarah site is a stratified site with woodland ceramics in the upper occupation and late woodland points in both of the upper occupations. These upper occupations produced abundant bison bone including foetal bone. The lower occupations produced less bone and no foetal bone, although absence of foetal bone in the lower occupations does not necessarily indicate a warm season occupation. This could be due to sample error or perthotaxic factors such as scavenging of the fragile bone by dogs or other carnivores. The dates from the Sarah site include 550+/-40 B.P.; 1430+/-80 B.P; 2810+/-80 B.P.; 3120+/-130 B.P. The lower occupations did not yield any diagnostic materials although debitage was abundant. These occupations were most productive at the edge of the large sand dune at the southern edge of the excavations. It is assumed that the major portion of these occupations have been overridden by the dune in the past 3000 years. Heavy earthmoving equipment would be required to remove this overburden which limits the possibility of future excavation. Environment The Sarah site is a large area located at the eastern end of the Crepeele locale. Ground cover is a mosaic of aspen poplar groves and patches of mesic grass prairie. Excavation profiles indicate that this has been the situation since early precontact times, although as local climatic conditions change (primarily rainfall), the relative size of these areas and where they may have occurred also changed. The soil is aeolian sand sheet derived from delta outwash deposits along the western edge of glacial Lake Hind. The present topography is a variable dune landscape reworked by aeolian activity that creates a mosaic of microhabitats. These include forested patches in the lee of sand dunes with grassland on the southern and western exposures and small damp lowlands that support balsam poplar, willows, red osier dogwood, high-bush cranberry and water birch. There is no permanent water source in the area although a small seasonal stream meanders through a damp lowland to the east of the Sarah site.
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Sarah 2003 and Sarah 2004,
Name Access
Sarah site DiMe-28
Subject Access
Archaeology Crepeele locale Sarah site DiMe-28
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Lovstrom Block F - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12617
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.7
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988
History / Biographical
In 1988 four 1m2 units were excavated in this Block F. The forest cover is identical to that of Block E, with an open oak forest with a light understory of saskatoon, hazelnut, poison ivy and sarsaparilla. Underneath the litter mat (Ah) is a shallow, 15-20 cm “A” horizon of dark grey/brown silty loam with a high representation of pebble size clasts. The glacial clays, encountered at 20 cm below surface, consist of a matrix of light tan sandy clays containing rounded pebble to cobble size rocks. The recoveries from this block consisted of a few ceramics, including Vickers Focus rim sherds, four lithic tools and a number of small bison bone fragments. There was no discernible cultural stratigraphy in the four 1m2 units and the limited deposits of bone, ceramics and lithics were dispersed randomly throughout the 25 cm of cultural matrix. The lithic materials frequencies were similar to those in Block E with local cherts and KRF being the most abundant categories. A small amount of fire-cracked rock and a few large identifiable bison bones were recovered – all distributed randomly with little evidence for any pattern of clustering. No RC dates.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-sub series contains: Summary information of field methology, number and co-ordinates of excavations, personnel and their staff position; Field journals are daily records of recoveries, features and activities at the site; Site records include excavation level and unit summaries, feature sheets, profiles; sample records and maps; Artifact catalogues are lists and identifications of all artifacts recovered; Photographs are of excavation units, features, the landscape and personnel.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block F - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block F
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Lovstrom Block G 1988 - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12628
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.8
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988
History / Biographical
In 1988 four units were excavated in Block G. The vegetation is similar to other areas in the locale with an open oak forest with a light understory of saskatoon, hazelnut, poison ivy and sarsaparilla. Excavations recovered artifacts between 0 cm – 15 cm b.s. The cultural deposits are very shallow and it is quite possible that what appears to be a single occupation may in fact represent multiple occupation compressed deposits as a result of deflation or the lack of sedimentation in this raised area. This latter view is supported by the ceramics which appear to be a mixture of Blackduck and Vickers Focus wares. The frequency and distribution of cultural material from block G contrasts with that of other sites in the locale. While the diagnostic materials are similar, the nature of the background debris and the associated lithic assemblage suggests that this area was utilized for a different set of activities. Unlike Blocks E and H, there is very little in the way of ceramics, fire-cracked rock or bison bone, yet a significant amount of lithic debitage and six Plains/Prairie Side-notched projectile points were recovered. No unifaces or scrapers were recovered. This may be an area where activities such as manufacture and hafting of projectile points; hunting activities, butchering and refuse disposal took place. No RC dates were taken.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-sub series contains: Summary information of field methology, number and co-ordinates of excavations, personnel and their staff position; Field journals are daily records of recoveries, features and activities at the site; Site records include excavation level and unit summaries, feature sheets, profiles; sample records and maps; Artifact catalogues are lists and identifications of all artifacts recovered; Photographs are of excavation units, features, the landscape and personnel.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block G 1988 - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block G
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Lovstrom Block H - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12638
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988 - 1991
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.9
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1988 - 1991
History / Biographical
The vegetation in block H is similar to other areas in the locale with an open oak forest with a light understory of saskatoon, hazelnut, poison ivy and sarsaparilla. The excavations of the eight 1m2 units in 1988 resulted in the recovery of over 650 ceramic fragments including 20 rim sherds from at least four vessels, a grooved maul, fire-cracked rock, lithic debitage and a reworked Avonlea projectile point. A large amount of bison bone, including a number of axial elements and a fragmented skull were also recovered. Based on the 1988 recoveries at the site further excavations took place in 1991. Nine excavation units were opened next to the previous excavations. Another 250 ceramic sherds were recovered in 1991. Nine vessels have been identified based on rim sherds. Vickers Focus and Woodland vessels have been identified and two vessels similar to Scattered Village Complex were recovered. The lithic material assemblage is intermediate between Blocks G and E with KRF being the most frequent material category followed by local cherts. Two features, a hearth and a curvilinear arrangement of rock were recovered. The high numbers of ceramic fragments suggests a habitation area, rather than hunting or butchering behavior. However, the separation of occupations at the site is difficult to establish and there may be different uses of the site by successive occupations. Radiocarbon dates from this block indicate two occupations separated in time by some 300 years. XU 181 – 405/110 BP and XU 184 – 780/110 BP.
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Lovstrom Block H 1988 and Lovstrom Block H 1991.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block H - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block H
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North Lauder locale Radiocarbon Dates

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12326
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1997-2000
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
2.5
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1997-2000
Material Details
Radiocarbon date reports have been scanned in multi-page PDF files.
History / Biographical
The North Lauder locale has a long archaeological and geological history that is important for understanding the forces that shaped the region. Archaeological research in the locale shows that the area has been occupied by humans for at least the past 6,500 years. Environmental forces provided an area of diverse resources that attracted early peoples. Archaeologists from Brandon University have been conducting research in the North Lauder locale that has focused on the Atkinson site, a 6,500 year old hunter-gatherer site and Flintstone Hill. The geomorphology of the glacial Lake Hind Basin over the past 11,000 years is known primarily through the study of a cut bank along the Souris River. Flintstone Hill contains the most complete stratigraphic record for the post-glacial period on the northern plains. The site has been extensively studied by geoarchaeologists, geologists and paleoenvironmentalists over many years and their findings have contributed to our understanding of the region. Radiocarbon dates were obtained from the Atkinson site and Flintstone Hill. Radiocarbon dating The technique of radiocarbon dating was developed by Willard Libby and his colleagues at the University of Chicago in 1949. Radiocarbon dating is used to estimate the age of organic remains from archaeological sites. Organic matter has a radioactive form of carbon (C14) that begins to decay upon death. C14 decays at a steady, known rate of a half life of 5,730 years. The technique is useful for material up to 50,000 years. Fluctuations of C14 in the atmosphere can affect results so dates are calibrated against dendrochronology. Radiocarbon dates are calibrated to calendar years. Dates are reported in radiocarbon years or Before Present. Before Present refers to dates before 1950. The introduction of massive amounts of C14, due to atomic bomb and surface testing of atomic weapons, has widely increased the standard deviation on all dates after A.D. 1700 causing these dates to be unreliable. Accelerated mass spectrometry can more accurately measure C14 with smaller samples and can date materials to 80,000 years.
Scope and Content
Sub sub series contains radiocarbon dates from: the Atkinson site and Flintstone Hill.
Name Access
North Lauder locale Radiocarbon Dates
Subject Access
Archaeology North Lauder locale North Lauder locale Radiocarbon Dates
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Lawrence Jones collection

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12333
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1957-1959, 1976-1992
Accession Number
9-2011
Part Of
RG 6 Brandon University fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
MG 3 1.24
Accession Number
9-2011
GMD
textual records
Date Range
1957-1959, 1976-1992
Physical Description
30 cm
History / Biographical
See RG 6 Brandon University fonds, 7.4.1 Dean of Music for biographical information.
Custodial History
The records were collected during the course of Jones' career as a member of the School of Music and as Dean of the School of Music. They remained in his possession until their donation to the McKee Archives on June 29, 2011.
Scope and Content
Collection consists of records created and collected during the course of Lawrence Jones' teaching career in the School of Music and during his tenure as Dean of the School of Music at Brandon University. Records include: dean's log books; recital programs and related materials; personal documents; academic papers; planning documents; contracts; administration documents; workshop documents; teaching documents; proposals; reviews; evaluations; violin concerto by S.C. Eckhardt-Gramatte, piano score, edited by Lawrence Jones. Topics include: planning for the School of Music; Master's degree program; award winners; the music building expansion; adjudicating; the New Brandon University Trio; and the National Music Festival.
Name Access
Lawrence Jones
Brandon University Trio
Shane Levesque
National Music Festival
Peggy Sharpe
Deidre Irons
Kenneth Drake
School of Music
Subject Access
Education
music
administration
performing arts
performing artists
Storage Location
MG 3 Brandon University Teaching and Administration 1.24 Lawrence Jones
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Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1985-1986
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.1
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1985-1986
History / Biographical
The Lovstrom surface collection came from small fields cleared within, and adjacent to, the major portions of the site which were excavated. The Lovstroms initial collection has since been added to by field personnel from Brandon University. The initial collections consisted of lithics and ceramics. A collection of faunal remains from the cultivated area was made by a Brandon University zooarchaeology class in 1986 which yielded specimens of elk, canid, mussels, and sucker, in addition to an expected abundance of bison. Since these materials were in a surface context, it may be that some of the faunal remains were historic. The high biodiversity and evidence of pre-Europeon contact prompted the decision to test the Lovstrom locale. Nine 1m2 units were excavated in 1985 and, in 1986, an additional 15 1m2 units were excavated for a total of 24 test units. This testing indicated the presence of a large precontact locale with lithics, woodland ceramics and large amounts of reasonably well-preserved faunal materials. The lithics indicated a late Prehistoric occupation (Nicholson 1986:35). However, the ceramics were more useful in that they identified the presence of Late Woodland cultures (Blackduck and Duckbay) and a single Middle Missouri vessel. It is believed that the Middle Missouri vessel was imported since the paste and construction/decorative technology differ distinctively from that of all other vessels recovered from the site. It was on the basis of an examination of these surface finds that the decision to test the Lovstrom site was made. These test excavations were conducted during the summers of 1985 and 1986. Field investigations through shovel tests, excavation units, and examination of rodent mounds, indicated that the cultural deposits at the Lovstrom locale extend approximately 500m north from the edge of the Souris channel and eastward for over two hundred meters from the escarpment along Jock’s Creek. The presence of dense forest vegetation covering much of the locale, and the subsurface nature of the archaeological deposits obscured surface indications. Radiocarbon dates: Test Unit 4: 1215/320 BP and Test Unit 8 1280/190 BP
Scope and Content
Sub-series has been divided into sub sub series including: Lovstrom survey 1985 and Lovstrom survey 1986
Name Access
Lovstrom survey
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom survey
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Lovstrom Block A - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12451
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.2
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
History / Biographical
Block A was the most southern site in the locale. The excavation block consisted of 12 contiguous 1m2 units dug in a 3m x 4m rectangle. The block was the least productive of cultural materials, and bone preservation was the poorest. Under the sod, the black loam layer appeared at 5 cm below surface, and the glacial clay at 25 cm below surface. Excavators described the soil matrix as gritty and silty, and it became concrete hard when dried. The occupation or bone layer extended from 10 to 25 cm below surface and consisted of a contiguous scatter of FCR and unidentifiable large ungulate bone which was heavily processed and intensively scavenged by carnivores. Most cultural materials were recovered within this layer. Fire cracked rock (FCR) and small burnt bone fragments were present but no intact hearths or processing features were evident. Non-cultural materials included limestone and other natural pebbles derived from the parent till. (These small limestone pebbles were apparent in the occupation layers in other blocks as well). Root and rodent disturbance was extensive throughout Block A. Most units were excavated to gravelly clay till. Nine of the twelve units were dug to level 4b, which ended at 40 cm b.s. No further excavations were done at this site. No C14 dates were taken.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-sub series contains: Summary information of field methology, number and co-ordinates of excavations, personnel and their staff position; Field journals are daily records of recoveries, features and activities at the site; Site records include excavation level and unit summaries, feature sheets, profiles; sample records and maps; Artifact catalogues are lists and identifications of all artifacts recovered; Photographs are of excavation units, features, the landscape and personnel.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block A - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block A
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Lovstrom Block B - summary

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12479
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
3.3
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1987
History / Biographical
Block B consisted of 20 contiguous 1m2 units excavated to 30 cm below surface. (except unit 58 which was excavated to 35 cm bs to obtain extended soil profile). The block is situated in recent oak and poplar forest at the head of a ravine leading to Jock’s Creek, adjacent to an area cleared for market gardening. As was the case with Block A, the understory is heavily overgrown with hazelnut, chokecherry, saskatoon, and a poison ivy/sarsaparilla ground cover. The soil levels below the sod in Block B consisted of a black, silty, and gritty loam layer from 5 cm to 23 cm below surface, a yellow and sandy clay from 23 cm to 30 cm below surface, and glacial till at 30 cm below surface. As in Block A, limestone cobbles were found throughout the occupation level around the bone. It is evident that bioturbation – primarily tree roots and rodent burrowing – have significantly altered patterns of original deposition of lithics, ceramics and small bone. The faunal layer lay close to the surface, situated entirely in the black loam 5 cm – 23 cm below surface. The 23 cm depth also marked the end of the dark silty loam. At 10 cm below surface, a discernible patterning of the bone appeared. Concentrations of bone in narrow rows ran in an irregular pattern from the northwest to the southeast part of the block. This pattern was most apparent in the north end of the block which is the highest point in the block. In the same 1m2 unit, patches of weathered, very poorly preserved bone would be found lying close to patches of well preserved bone. It is believed that this variability in preservation results from uneven rates of burial due to taphic activities of pocket gophers or other agents of bioturbation. The same pattern of uneven preservation occurs over much of the locale but is most evident in Block B. Diagnostic lithics included eleven projectile points that were predominantly Plains or Prairie Side-notch types, but included two unnotched triangular points. Cord-wrapped impressed rim sherds and body sherds were recovered. The ceramics are variants of the Woodland Blackduck horizon. RC dates: XU49 – 675/80 BP XU 59 – 705/75BP.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-sub series contains: Summary information of field methology, number and co-ordinates of excavations, personnel and their staff position; Field journals are daily records of recoveries, features and activities at the site; Site records include excavation level and unit summaries, feature sheets, profiles; sample records and maps; Artifact catalogues are lists and identifications of all artifacts recovered; Photographs are of excavation units, features, the landscape and personnel.
Name Access
Lovstrom Block B - summary
Subject Access
Archaeology Lovstrom locale Lovstrom Block B
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Flintstone Hill - DiMe-26

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions12283
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1997-2000
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
2.2
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
1997-2000
History / Biographical
Flintstone Hill is located on the north bank of the Souris River. It is a deeply stratified lacustrine, fluvial and aeolian soil profile that has been exposed by the river through stream-bank erosion. This section is thought to be the most complete middle to late Holocene exposure on the northeastern plains. While the value of the site is primarily for paleo-environmental research and reconstruction, cultural deposits have been identified at the site. Local collectors have picked up lithic materials as they eroded out of the bank for the past several decades and it was they who had named the site. Mr. Bruce Timms from Lauder first drew the Flintstone Hill site to the attention of Dr. Nicholson of Brandon University. During the mid 1990’s to the early 2000’s archaeological testing took place on Flintstone Hill. In 1998, an archaeological field crew dug a series of overlapping trenches down the slope of the profile and produced a schematic drawing. A peat layer at the bottom of this profile, dated from the top at 9,400 RCY and at the bottom to 10,400 RCY, has provided details of marsh plant and insect communities at this time. Subsequent archaeological investigations at the site recovered several cultural deposits including: a hearth dating to 3250+/-70 R.C.Y. (BETA 109529); a butchered atlas bone 4090+/-70 R.C.Y. (BETA 109990); and bone fragments accompanied by Swan River Chert and Knife River Flint lithic flakes 5350+/-50 (BETA 109530). While no diagnostic tools were recovered, these dates suggest that this occupation, which is contemporary with the Atkinson site, may be a Gowen occupation. Extensive paleo-environmental research has been conducted at the site. Dr. Running, a geomorphologist from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, participated in the Study of Cultural Adaptations in the Prairie Ecozone (SCAPE) Project and he and his students tested the site for several years. He was joined in this effort by Dr. Havholm, Dr. Boyd, Dr. Wiseman, Dr. Beaudoin, and other SCAPE researchers in the interpretation of the paleo-environment of the Glacial Lake Hind basin. The following article is recommended reading. Running, Garry L., Karen G. Havholm, Matt Boyd and Dion J. Wiseman 2002 Holocene Stratigraphy and Geomorphology of Flintstone Hill, Lauder Sandhills, Glacial Lake Hind Basin, Southwestern Manitoba. Geographie Physique et Quaternaire 56(2-3):291-303.
Scope and Content
Sub series has been divided into two sub sub series including: (1) Flintstone Hill 1997 (2) Flintstone Hill 1998-2000
Name Access
Flintstone Hill - DiMe-26
Subject Access
Archaeology North Lauder locale Flintstone Hill - DiMe-26
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Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2008
Accession Number
1-2010
Part Of
RG 7 Beverley Nicholson fonds
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
1.1
Accession Number
1-2010
GMD
multiple media
Date Range
2003-2008
History / Biographical
The high biodiversity and evidence of pre-Europeon contact prompted the decision to test the Crepeele locale. The survey was named in recognition of the Casselman family, the original landowners. Archaeological testing began in the Crepeele locale in May 2003 on property now owned by the Crepeele family. The locale covers over 6 sections or approximately 3,800 acres of land in an area of stabilized sand dunes and wetlands covered with mixed forest and prairie grass. Given the terrain, the size of the crew and time constrains, an area of approximately 60 acres was chosen for the survey. The survey used the established archaeological methodology of walking the selected area and using a shovel test surveyed grid. The use of GIS technology to locate the exact test spot and record the information into a GIS database was a significant advance and was one of the advantages of the integration of multi-disciplinary techniques encouraged by the SCAPE project. Over one half of the test pits resulted in the recovery of cultural materials. The results of the Casselman survey indicated several areas for further examination including areas that became the Crepeele, Sarah and Graham sites.
Scope and Content
Sub sub series has been divided into five sub sub sub series including: (1) Summary information; (2) Field journals; (3) Site records; (4) Artifact catalogues; and (5) Photographs.
Name Access
Casselman survey
Subject Access
Archaeology Crepeele locale Casselman survey
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McGuinness family papers and letters

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions13656
Part Of
Fred McGuinness collection
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
textual records
Date Range
c. 1916 - 2010
Accession Number
1-2015
Other Title Info
Title based on the contents of the subseries
Part Of
Fred McGuinness collection
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
McG 1.1
Accession Number
1-2015
GMD
textual records
Date Range
c. 1916 - 2010
Physical Description
Approximately 18 cm of textual records
History / Biographical
See collection level description for history/biography information on Frederick George McGuinness. Frederick George McGuinness’ maternal grandparents were John POPE (b. 28 January 1852 – d. 24 January 1923) and Mary DARROCH (b. 24 May 1861 – d. 18 September 1942). Canadian Census records for 1906 show John was born in England and immigrated to Canada in 1870. Mary was born in Wellington, Ontario. John and Mary married in Brandon on 11 July 1888. The POPE family was considered one of Brandon’s pioneer families and all nine children were born in Brandon: Fred McGUINNESS’ mother Isabella Louisa POPE, John “Jack” Stuart/Stewart POPE, Annie Ruby POPE, Alice Jane POPE, George Campbell POPE, Henry Victor James POPE, Roy Clendon POPE, Hugh Edward POPE (b. 23 February 1901 – d. 9 November 1904), and Albert William POPE (b. 1 April 1903 – d. 17 November 1904). According to the Brandon City Henderson Directories, maternal patriarch John POPE worked as a bartender in the Brunswick Hotel (in 1906), the King Edward Hotel (from 1907-1911), and the Royal George Hotel (by 1913-14). He later became an employee at the Empire Brewing Company (1921). The 1901 Canadian Census records both his brother George (b. 23 October 1843), working as a contractor, and his sister-in-law Ella DARROCH (b. 16 August 1872) as living with the POPE family. It appears George stayed with the family for a decade. Isabella Louisa POPE (b. 09 July 1889 – 16 December 1966) worked as clerk and stenographer with the Dominion Express Company between 1907 and 1909. It was there that she likely met her future husband, William Frederick McGUINNESS, whom she married in Brandon on 2 November 1910. The 1911 Canadian Census shows William, Louisa and their one-month old daughter Mary Charlotte living with Louisa’s parents on 629 9th Street in Brandon. William was working as cashier with Dominion Express Company at the time. [See William Frederick McGuinness below for more information about Louisa and William.] By 1916, the POPE family was living at 708 10th Street, while Louisa and William McGUINNESS were living at their home at 337 17th Street. All of the Pope brothers listed the Tenth Street address as their home and their military accomplishments are mentioned in Fred McGuinness’ popular short story “The Button Bag” that was read on CBC’s Morningside radio program and later published in his book Letters from Section 17 (1999). John “Jack” Stuart/Stewart POPE (b. 18 March 1891 – 5 March 1971) managed the Empire Hotel’s News Stand in 1909. From 1913 to 1914, he was a clerk with the Grand View Hotel. Jack married Helen Frances FINNEGAN on 1 May 1914. On 7 November 1916, Jack enlisted with the Canadian Field Artillery’s 76th Depot Battery in Winnipeg (regimental # 12501611). His attestation papers list his occupation as a packer, likely with the Empire Brewing Company, a company to which he would return after the war. The 1921 Canadian Census lists Jack as single and living at his parent’s Tenth Street home. By 1931, Jack was working as a foreman with the Empire Beverage Company. Jack’s listings in Henderson’s Brandon City Directories are sporadic throughout the 1930s and 1940s but it appears he was an employee with the Empire Beverage Company until 1941. Jack was listed as an engineer working at the Brandon Sanatorium from 1947 to 1949. Jack died on 5 March 1971 and was interred in the Veterans’ Section of the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 27, Block C, Plot 124); his grave marker affiliates him with the 181st Battalion. Anna “Annie” Ruby POPE (3 August 1892 – 26 December 1971) was listed as a dressmaker in Henderson’s Brandon City Directory for 1919. Shortly thereafter, she would become a long-term employee with Yaegers Furs (from 1921 onwards) working as an operator and fur finisher. After her father’s death in 1923, Annie moved with her mother and brothers to 228 15th Street. She lived at that address until her death on 26 December 1971. She passed away in Yorkton, Saskatchewan (where her surviving sister Mrs. Alice Jane Murray lived), and was interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 6, Block B, Plot 11). The furrier Yaegers Furs Ltd. closed its shop early in her honour. Alice Jane POPE (MURRAY) (b. 8 May 1894 – d. 11 May 1983) was a binder, folder, and stenographer with Cox Printing Copy from 1914 to 1919. She married Alexander Leo Murray on 8 October 1919 and moved with her husband, a butcher and grocery merchant, to Kenora, Ontario. Alice died in 1983 in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. George Campbell POPE (b. 13 December 1896 – d. 3 September 1918) was listed as an employee of the Empire Brewing Company from 1913 to 1914 in the Brandon City Henderson Directories. His attestation papers identify him as a chemist’s assistant. George had been with 99th Manitoba Rangers for six years prior to enlisting with the 181st Battalion on 12 February 1916 (regimental # 855132). Once overseas, George was transferred to the 44th Battalion. He was killed in action six weeks before the war’s end on 3 September 1918. His Commonwealth War Grave is in the Chapel Corner Cemetery (Pas de Calais, France). Henry ”Harry” Victor James POPE (b. 15 February 1897 – d. 18 September 1952) was another Pope brother to work with the Empire Brewing/Beverage Company. Harry became a long-term employee of the brewer, working with the company from 1917 to 1951. During that time, the Brandon City Henderson’s Directories list Harry as a bottler (1925-31) and Vice President (1933, 1941-45). He briefly left the company in 1945 to work as a foreman with the Bell Bottling Company, and again in 1952. Harry never married. He lived with his sister in their family home until his death in 1952. He is interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 6, Block B, Plot 63). Roy Clendon POPE (b. 4 April 1899 – d. 03 March 1966) enlisted with the City of Brandon’s 181st Battalion on 3 April 1916 (regimental # 865466). He listed his occupation as bridge builder on his attestation papers. Once overseas, Roy was transferred to the 44th Battalion. He would survive the war and was awarded a Military Medal on 3 July 1919. After the war he became an employee with the Canadian Northern Railway (CNR) (1921-23). Roy became a carpenter by trade (1925-1945). He served as the secretary to the Kinsmen Club from 1931-33 and worked briefly with the RCAF as a laborer in 1943. By 1949 he had a wife, Anne, and moved from his family home to live at 623 23rd Street. He worked as a clerk and caretaker of the Land Titles Office from 1951-54. Roy is buried in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 6, Block B, Plot 65). Fred McGuinness’ paternal grandparents were Frederick Anthony McGUINNESS (b. August 1857-1862 – d. 5 March 1933) and Anna Charlotte GALLAGHER (b. 19 September 1861/1863/1864 – d. 10 March 1948). Born to Irish parents, Canadian Census records list England (1891, 1901) and Newfoundland (1911) as birthplaces for F.A. McGuinness. He immigrated to Canada in 1864 or 1865 and married Charlotte GALLAGHER in 1882. His wife, Charlotte, was born in Ontario. The couple had four children: William Frederick McGUINNESS, Ernest Albert McGUINNESS, Annie May McGUINNESS, and Frederick Gallagher McGUINNESS. The family moved to Manitoba in 1900 and while in Brandon, Frederick Anthony worked as a CPR conductor from 1906 to 1924/25. He would die in Brandon two weeks before his eldest son, William, succumbed to illness. He is interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 22, Block D, Plot 46). William Frederick McGUINNESS (b. 22 August 1884 – d. 18 March 1933) was born in Ottawa and graduated with honors from the Willis School of Accountancy in that city. He moved with his family to Manitoba and worked as a cashier with the CPR Express Office from 1900 to 1905. From 1906 to 1911, he worked as a clerk with the Dominion Express Company. In 1910, William married Isabella Louisa POPE and they would have six children: Mary Charlotte, Dorreene Louise, Kathleen Ruth, Frederick George, Orma Grace, and Carol. From 1914-1919, W.F. McGuinness was the secretary-treasurer of the Hanbury Hardware Company; by 1921, he was the general manager. In 1925, W.F. McGuinness was manager of the Manitoba Hardware Company Limited and by 1927 he was the Company’s secretary-treasurer. He was also a member of a number of service clubs and fraternal organizations. From 1919-1923, he served as a director of the Manitoba Winter Fair and Fat Stock Show, representing the Manitoba Poultry Association. He was also a Mason and was involved with Brandon’s Council of the Board of Trade, Brandon Curling Club (1927 treasurer), and the Lawn Bowling Club. W.F. McGuinness passed away at the age of 49 after suffering from an infection for eight months, a complication resulting from influenza. He is interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 22, Block D, Plot 48). While in Brandon, Ernest Albert McGUINNESS (b. 10 July 1886 – d. 30 August 1943) worked as a CPR ticket agent from at least 1906 to 1916. He was also a well-known baritone in the community. Ernest married Evelina G. DOLMAGE in Souris on 7 August 1912. They would have three daughters: Anna Charlotte, Maire, and Mrs. Edward May. Ernest moved to Winnipeg with his family in 1916 and lived there until his death in 1943. He is interred in the McGUINNESS family plot in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 22, Block D, Plot 48). Annie May McGUINNESS (b. 23 December 1888 – d. 23 March 1948) was born in Carleton, Ontario. She worked as a laundress at the Brandon Asylum in 1907. She became a stenographer and worked with a number of firms, including George White Sons and Company in 1913, A.G. Buckingham in 1917, Coldwell Coleman and Kerr from 1919-43, and Kerr, McQuarrie & Meighen in 1945. Annie was a member of the First Presbyterian Church and a charter member of the Heather Club. She died in Brandon at the age of 59, and was interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 22, Block D, Plot 22). Frederick Gallagher McGUINNESS (b. 1891 – d. 23 May 1968) was born in Ottawa, Ontario. While in Brandon, he was a student (1911) and secretary of Boys’ Work for the YMCA in 1913. He moved to Winnipeg where he graduated from the Manitoba Medical College in 1917. On 3 December 1917, Lieutenant F.G. McGuinness enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps in Winnipeg. He served in France with the Royal Army Medical Corps and was a Medical Officer attached with the Ninth Royal Irish Fusiliers. Lt. McGuiness survived the war and returned to Winnipeg where he married Myrtle Eva WHITE in Winnipeg on 12 September 1922. They would have a son Jim “Jimmy” and a daughter Elizabeth (SHANNON). Dr. McGuinness practiced in Obstetrics and Gynecology and taught at the University of Manitoba’s Medical School from 1923 onwards. He was instrumental in helping his nephew, Frederick George McGUINNESS return to school after he was injured in the Second World War. Dr. McGuinness died in Winnipeg at the Deer Lodge Hospital following a lengthy illness. Frederick George McGUINNESS had five sisters, three older and two younger. The eldest sister, Mary Charlotte McGuinness (b. 1 May 1911 – d. 02 December 1973), was born in Portage la Prairie. While in Brandon, she worked as a music teacher from 1937 to 1943 and was an organist with Knox United Church from 1941 to 1943. She married Reverend Henry John Herbert OLDFIELD (b. 4 June 1914, Saanich – d. September 2007, Victoria). They had two sons, John and William Frederick “Fred” (b. 1945 – d. 21 August 1986). Mary passed away in Coquitlam, BC. Dorreene “Doney” Louise McGUINNESS (b. 31 December 1912 – d. 16 February 1976) was born in Virden, Manitoba. She married Dr. Robert INGLIS (b. 17 April 1913 – d. November 1982) and had four children. Dorreene passed away in Estevan, Saskatchewan and is buried in Souris Valley Memorial Gardens. Kathleen Ruth McGUINNESS (b. 12 September 1915 – d. 15 September 1963) was born in Brandon, Manitoba. She worked as an operator with Government Phones from 1937 to 1941 and as a clerk with CPR Telegraphs from 1943 to 1951. In 1951, she was President of the Trillium Business and Professional Women’s Club. She died in Brandon at the age of 48, and was interred in the Brandon Municipal Cemetery (Section 22, Block D, Plot 50). Orma Grace McGuinness (b. 13 January 1925 – d. 3 January 2013) was born in Brandon. She had trained as a nurse by 1947. She married George Edmond LONGPHEE (b. 9 September 1924, Souris, PEI – d. 7 May 2002, Sidney, BC) in Brandon on 1 June 1948. They had five children. Orma passed away in Sidney, BC. Carol McGUINNESS married Herbert YOUNG on 16 January 1954 and had two children. She is the last surviving McGuinness sister of Frederick George McGuinness.
Custodial History
Accession 1-2015 contains records created and collected over the course of McGuinness’ career as a newspaper journalist and freelance writer. The Estate of Fred McGuinness donated the materials to the SJ McKee Archives circa 2011. The Archives accessioned the records in 2015.
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of records created and collected by members of the McGuinness family, as well as records created and collected by Fred McGuinness during his years in the Canadian navy, college, and as a journalist, editor, and freelance writer. The papers and letters include materials from paternal and maternal sides of the McGuinness family. Records in the subseries consist of newspaper clippings, correspondence, financial papers, legal documents, and military records .
Notes
Biographical information about the Pope-McGuinness families was obtained from the following: Manitoba Vital Statistics Database for birth, marriages, deaths; 1901, 1906, 1911 Canadian Censuses for immigration dates, addresses, occupations; Henderson’s Brandon City Directory (1906-1955) for addresses and occupations; obituaries published in the Brandon Daily Sun, Brandon Sun, and Winnipeg Free Press.
Accruals
Closed
Finding Aid
File level inventory is available
Storage Location
2015 accessions
Related Material
McGuinness wrote about his family and published snippets in his newspaper columns (see McG 2 Newspaper career series), articles (see McG 3.2 Miscellaneous freelance) and monographs (see McG 5 series). His book, Letters from Section 17: A Collection of Morningside Essays is autobiographical in nature
Trillium Business and Professional Women’s Club records
Arrangement
Arrangement was artificially created by the Archives. Subseries has been re-arranged according to publication period.
Documents

McG 1_1 McGuinness family papers and letters inventory.pdf

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Fred McGuinness correspondence

http://archives.brandonu.ca/en/permalink/descriptions13657
Part Of
Fred McGuinness collection
Description Level
Sub-series
GMD
textual records
Date Range
c. 1910 - 2010
Accession Number
1-2015
Other Title Info
Title based on the contents of the subseries
Part Of
Fred McGuinness collection
Description Level
Sub-series
Series Number
McG 1.2
Accession Number
1-2015
GMD
textual records
Date Range
c. 1910 - 2010
Physical Description
Approximately 36 cm of textual records
1 artifact
History / Biographical
See collection level description for history/biography information on Frederick George McGuinness.
Custodial History
Accession 1-2015 contains records created and collected over the course of McGuinness’ career as a newspaper journalist and freelance writer. The Estate of Fred McGuinness donated the materials to the SJ McKee Archives circa 2011. The Archives accessioned the records in 2015.
Scope and Content
Subseries consists of records created and collected by Fred McGuinness during his years in the Canadian navy, college, federal government (Unemployment Insurance Commission), Saskatchewan government (Saskatchewan Jubilee), and as a journalist, editor, and freelance writer. The papers and letters include materials from some members of the McGuinness family who assisted McGuinness with his research, as well as reader correspondence and materials from workshop participants. Readers of McGuinness’ columns often reminisced about Brandon’s local history and enclosed newspapers clippings, photographs, and pamphlets with their correspondence. Participants from his memoir writing workshops submitted their personal or family memoirs for McGuinness to review, provide feedback, or add to his collection. Records in the subseries consist of correspondence (letters, e-mail communications, facsimiles, invitations, telegrams), newspaper clippings, programmes, ticket stubs. There is a Medicine Hat News logo patch located within File 10 1955-1965 Medicine Hat News.
Notes
In the file level inventories, square brackets at end of file names reference the original location of the file in the unprocessed Fred McGuinness collection. The original location is also noted on the front of each file folder.
Accruals
Closed
Finding Aid
File level inventory is available
Storage Location
2015 accessions
Related Material
John Everitt collection
Clarence Hopkin collection
Lawrence Stuckey collection
Jack Stothard collection
William Wallace papers
It is possible research and additional correspondence pertaining to McGuinness’ columns and research materials may be found in Personal papers (McG 1.1), Newspaper career (McG 2), Freelance (McG 3), Broadcasts, talks and workshops (McG 6). Photographs were pulled and added to McGuinness photographic collection (McG 9)
Arrangement
Arrangement was artificially created by the Archives. Subseries has been re-arranged according to publication period.
Documents

McG 1_2 Fred McGuinness correspondence inventory.pdf

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534 records – page 1 of 27.